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LEGIT Earn up to $1500 donating your sperm - Scam or Legit?

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Kanvi

Moderator
Staff member
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#1
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You can find ways to earn some cash by “using” your body, in a not freaky kind of way. For example, you can sell your plasma, or cut your long and beautiful hair before putting a price tag on it, and take part in paid clinical tests. Some people call it a donation, but donation means it’s free. For you, “donating” these specimens can mean extra cash.

But what else can you “donate” for some money aside from blood, hair, and clinical trials? For some men, you can provide your sperm and earn a big amount. And yes, some centers will pay good money for your healthy sperm. It may sound awkward and crazy, but truly, you can sell your “seed” in sperm banks all across the country. There are many donation centers US-wide which focus on sperm collection. (If you’re a woman, you can also donate your egg cells, and they will pay you for it, but for now, we are going to discuss earning money on sperm donation.)

Why Donate Your Sperm?

There are many reasons why people look for sperm donors coming from sperm banks.
  1. Some women have partners or husbands with low sperm count. It means that they cannot produce an offspring together, but they want to have a baby. For this, they need a sperm donor to fertilize the woman’s egg so that she can get pregnant.
  2. Some single women want to have a baby of their own even without a partner. There are also gay couples who wish to have a child, and so they turn to sperm banks for their need.
  3. Some men have genetic disorders that they don’t want to pass on to their child. As a result, they use the assistance of sperm banks.
These are just three of the reasons why people would opt for sperm donation centers. Anyway, these centers won’t accept everyone who comes through their doors for a donation. In fact, only about 5% of the total applicants for sperm donation gets the approval. Various requirements must be met before a person can sell his sperm for some money.

What Are The Requirements For Sperm Donation?

If you are donating your plasma, then, you have to pass specific health checks before you are allowed to give your blood. It is the same thing with sperm donation. Each sperm bank has its own set of requirements and standards to uphold. While there are general rules for all centers, some have additional policies which people who donate have to follow. You’ll have to expect that all sperm banks are selective with the donations, as well.

Generally, here are the requirements of the sperm donation centers:
  1. The donor must be 18 years old up to 39 years old.
  2. He must be at least 5 feet and 7 inches tall. (For some centers, the individual has to be taller than that.)
  3. The donor must be in a university, taking up a college course, or is already a degree holder.
  4. He must not be a smoker.
  5. His family history is free of physical health issues.
  6. He must not be a carrier of genetic diseases.
  7. The donor and his immediate family must not be suffering from any mental health condition.
As for the compensation on your sperm donation, the amount that you will get will depend upon a few things like your location, your donation center, your age, your health status, etc.

To give you an idea, let’s assume that you are a qualified donor and you went to Cryobank. It is one of the biggest donation centers in the country. Anyway, the center will allow you to provide your sperm for up to three times a week. It means that in a month, you can earn a total of $1,500 for your sperm donation. It is also essential to make your time commitment with the sperm bank and that you must regularly provide your “seed” to them.

For instance:

Your contract will specify that you commit to 2 sessions a week for at least six months. For every qualified sample, you will earn $100. If you fulfill the period specified in your agreement, you will get another $500. It’s not an enormous amount, and it won’t make you wealthy, but the money is good and decent.

How To Locate Sperm Banks Within Your Area

In all major cities in the United States, there is at least one sperm bank. You won’t see it labeled as SPERM BANK HERE, and you won’t find it easily. They operate discreetly because, let’s face it, donating sperm for money is a bit odd for many people. The centers are just protecting their clients and their donors.

Anyway, you can find a sperm bank near you by browsing this site - https://www.spermbankdirectory.com/category/home/. Click on your location, and you will see the center’s address. If you are a Yellow Pages user, then, go to “sperm banks.” Google can also help by typing in “sperm banks in _________ city.”

OUR VERDICT: Scam or Legit?

Earning money from sperm donation is 100% LEGIT. IF YOU QUALIFY with all the rules and policies, you can make up to $1,500 a month, depending upon which donation center you provide your sperm. In a way, you’re helping a person or a couple in need.

YOUR TURN

If you have personal experience or first-hand knowledge about sperm donation, then, we need your story. Please tell us how it worked for you, and all the other details that you can spare for our readers. Thank you very much for your help!
 

CaptainE

Well-known member
76
49
8
#2
I like the idea of making money on this. However while the article does mention the money aspect, it completely ignores the fact that you might have biological kids running around as an effect of a few quick books. I think that should probably be the first thing guys asks themselves if they do this. If they are okay with fathering kids. Indirectly.
 

CaptainE

Well-known member
76
49
8
#6
Donating your blood can help save lives but I also disagree with donating your stool.
There is a pretty cool article about the stool donation on here somewhere. Was pretty informative and changed my outlook on why that is needed.
 

Burt Maklin

Active member
28
3
0
#12
I like the idea of making money on this. However while the article does mention the money aspect, it completely ignores the fact that you might have biological kids running around as an effect of a few quick books. I think that should probably be the first thing guys asks themselves if they do this. If they are okay with fathering kids. Indirectly.
I don't know, man. I try not to get too philosophical about that. Yeah, people might be using my spunk to make babies, but that's their responsibility at the end of the day.
 

Burt Maklin

Active member
28
3
0
#15
Sigh. I was hoping someone else would post about their experiences donating sperm. But it looks like that would be up to me. I’ve donated sperm… several times. So lemme write about my experiences.

Why did I do it?

I needed the money. I can’t be more blunt than that. Sure, I think donating sperm is valuable to couples - and single women - looking to have kids of their own. And yeah, it did feel nice knowing that I was helping people have kids. But that’s kind of abstract, since I don’t really see my kids - or to be more accurate, I don’t really see the kids other people are having using my sperm.

So mostly, my motivation was money. And I honestly think that’s okay. As long as other people were benefiting from my, er, labors, why not get paid for it?

So what was it like?

When you see it in movies, the dude usually checks in, faps into a cup, then gives the sperm to a technician. Quick and simple.

But in reality, there’s a lot of paperwork that needs to be done. I’m a pretty private person, but I also had to give details about my life, including pre-existing conditions (both mine and my families) my medical history, diet, and whether I drank or not. The clinic also listed down my race, height, built, and eye and hair color, and education level.

On top of that, my semen had to be analyzed (for sperm count and other variables), meaning I had to “perform” for free first.

It kind of felt like I was being turned into a product in a catalog and my “specs” as a human were being listed. And that was deliberate. See, when people conceive artificially, they’d want to pick a certain donor - for example, a tall Latino with muscular build. So the clinic had to get all those details about me. (Even if I won’t personally have any direct interaction with the parents and child)

So what was it REALLY like?

It took a few months for me to get cleared. When I was cleared, I was told to avoid masturbating for a couple of days to get a high sperm count.

After that period, I went back to the clinic and was shown a private room. The room had some porn — from softcore to harder stuff - to help me get the job done. I ejaculated into a sterile cup which I turned over to a waiting technician (who was outside the room, of course).

Ethical concerns…

…I had none. I wasn’t worried about having an unknown number of kids running around the world. I think sperm is just one element, and doesn’t automatically making someone a father. There’s more to being a dad than giving your sperm. So I had no problems donating my sperm at all.

That’s my story. Hope other guys step forward about their experiences donating sperm!
 

Ben_the_Hobbit

Active member
25
10
0
#16
Since Burt Maklin shared his experiences, I think it’s time to share my own. No, I didn’t donate sperm. But my partner and I had trouble conceiving. My partner was fine, but I had low sperm count. We thought about adopting at first, but we figured since she had no problems reproductively (is that even a real word?), we could just go for a sperm donor.

The process is indeed interesting. You can literally pick the appearance and background of your sperm donor. My partner and I decided to use sperm from a donor who looked like me. And yes, in hindsight that does look extremely weird.

So we made our pick, and my partner was artificially inseminated. Everything went well, and we are now the proud parents of happy little girl.

Do I feel like this is really my child? Of course. To assume otherwise is patently ridiculous. You need to differentiate between biological and “real” (my own term) parenthood. A person may be a biological parent, but if they’re deadbeats, then they’re not really parents, are they? On the flipside, an adoptive can form deep bonds with a child who is not biologically their own.

My daughter is my daughter, hard stop. I’m glad this type of service is available for parents (or even responsible singles) who want kids. If you’re thinking about donating sperm, by all means do it. You’ll be making some people very happy (okay, that sounded wrong).
 

Holden

Well-known member
66
25
0
#18
I understand some people might have moral and ethical concerns about donating sperm. I think the usual concern is - yikes, I’ll be having kids around the world I don’t know off! But hey, this might sound a bit callous, but out of sight, out of mind, right? I think sperm banks have some pretty rigid rules in place to make sure the lives of the sperm donors, and that of the grown kids and parents are suitably separated.

But like Burt Maklin mentioned a while ago, there’s more to fatherhood than shared genetics. To be honest, my biological dad wasn’t a very good one. So that gave me the realization that there was more to being related than blood, you know? It’s all about personal bonds and all that greeting-card stuff.

But I’m beginning to digress, lol. I just think that in 2018, any sort of reservation should be gone from most people’s minds by now. Like Ben the Hobitt said, donating sperm is a valuable service to couples who can’t conceive. So that’s a great opportunity to reframe things: instead of having biological kids roaming the world, you’re helping people have kids… and those kids are very much their own!
 

CaptainE

Well-known member
76
49
8
#19
I understand some people might have moral and ethical concerns about donating sperm. I think the usual concern is - yikes, I’ll be having kids around the world I don’t know off! But hey, this might sound a bit callous, but out of sight, out of mind, right? I think sperm banks have some pretty rigid rules in place to make sure the lives of the sperm donors, and that of the grown kids and parents are suitably separated.

But like Burt Maklin mentioned a while ago, there’s more to fatherhood than shared genetics. To be honest, my biological dad wasn’t a very good one. So that gave me the realization that there was more to being related than blood, you know? It’s all about personal bonds and all that greeting-card stuff.

But I’m beginning to digress, lol. I just think that in 2018, any sort of reservation should be gone from most people’s minds by now. Like Ben the Hobitt said, donating sperm is a valuable service to couples who can’t conceive. So that’s a great opportunity to reframe things: instead of having biological kids roaming the world, you’re helping people have kids… and those kids are very much their own!
As for laws, it really depends on the country in which you do this. Some countries and I believe UK is one of them, you have the right to look up your biological parent, so if you were conceived from a sperm bank I assume you could simply contact them and be handed the info. In any case, though I am a bit against just filling a glass and having a bunch of kids running around I also see the upside for the people that can't conceive naturally.
 
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