LEGIT Earn Big Money Taking Part in Medical Trials - Scam or Legit?

Kanvi

Bronze Wordsmith
Apr 16, 2018
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earn-big-medical-trials.jpg

Modern medicine is advancing at a staggering rate. While there are a few things scientists haven’t figured out yet, our quality of health care has nonetheless been steadily increasing. Diseases such as chickenpox, smallpox, and measles used to be fatal, but are now completely treatable, if not outright preventable, thanks to accessible vaccines.

While scientists and researchers rightfully deserve most of the credit for these advancements, participants in human trials also deserve props. And surprise, surprise, most of these trials actually pay their participants well. They have to: subjecting oneself to a lab trial doesn’t exactly sound like a nice way to earn money. I mean, how many sci-fi movies have we seen where the hero gets led into some shady back-alley lab to get tested on?

The upside is, legit lab trials are just that: legit. They have to follow certain standards, so it’s like they’re going to pummel you with gamma rays (although let’s be honest, turning into the Hulk would be pretty awesome).

If you have a pioneering spirit, or are have a keen interest in scientific processes, I would suggest participating in lab trials. The pay is good and, most importantly, conditions are reasonably safe. To get you started, I compiled a list of clinics and websites where you can sign-in, and wrote down some important bits of info.

I tried a lot of these out, and got paid in the process. And I’m perfectly healthy! (Otherwise, I wouldn’t be writing this down) Check ‘em out:

1. ClinicalTrials

The website is a library of clinical studies being held all over the world. ClinicalTrials.gov is government-sponsored, and contains over 100,000 clinical trials. Its global scope means you can look for tests to participate in, no matter where you live.

This is where I first found options for clinical trials. Personally, I appreciated how it provides clear and detailed info on safety regulations and sponsorship disclosure. These pieces of info made me feel confident about my own safety.

ClinicalTrials.gov is extremely thorough (which I appreciated) but if that’s too overwhelming for you, you can check out the next two websites.

Link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/

2. Guinea Pigs Get Paid

Don’t let the tongue-in-cheek name fool you; this is a serious site. In addition to calls for clinical trial participants, they also have listings for other odd jobs. Some of the openings lead to old or dead links, so prepare to do some digging.

Link: https://www.gpgp.net/

3. BioTrax

BioTrax is based in the United Kingdom. If you’re a UK resident, you may want to try these guys first. A lot of their tests involve food, so prepare to gobble lots of test samples.

If there aren’t any openings at a given moment, you have the option of signing-up for notifications. That way, you’ll be one of the first to know when an opportunity comes around.

Link: http://biotraxlabs.com/

4. Universities and medical schools

If you can find any openings online, you can always look the old-fashioned way: pick up the phone and call your local colleges or medical schools. Institutions such as those are usually at the forefront of research, and should have available tests for you to take part in.

5. Classifieds

Occasionally, universities and medical schools will place ads in your local classifieds, or even Craigslist, so be sure to check those. A word of warning, though: literally anyone can put an ad calling for medical test participants. You need to do your due diligence and look into the companies placing the ad before signing-up.

“What kind of procedures will I take?”

To put it bluntly, it depends on the type of research being done, and the procedure being tested. Once, I lucked-out with my local classifieds when I found a trial for people looking to quit smoking. I was also trying to kick the habit, so it all worked out.

That said, here are some of the more common procedures I’ve found (and their corresponding payouts). This list at least gives you some idea of the tests you’ll be given.

Take Written Medical Tests ($15 per questionnaire)

This is the simplest, because you don’t actually subject your body to any medical procedures. All you do is answer questionnaires and surveys, which cover topics such as cognitive performance. It’s the lowest-paying item in this list, but hey, not bad for filling out a bunch of forms.

Sleep Studies ($175 to $200 per sleep cycle)

Among the different studies I participated in, this was by far my favorite. It isn’t often I can say I earned money in my sleep! The study I took part in paid $200 per night for two weeks. Yep, I earned $2,800 just by sleeping!

But take note, the test was for a sleep apnea machine. For two weeks I had to strap on the machine before I slept, which wasn’t something I was used to. Also, there were nights I had to wake up in the middle of the night to take tests and enter data.

Donate Plasma (Up to $30 per session)

Donating plasma isn’t exactly a clinical test, but it’s worth including in this list. If you’re not afraid of needles and have a few hours to spare, give this option a try. You can donate twice a week, giving you up to $60 per week. Pretty sweet. What’s also sweet is the treat they give you after each session!

Participate in MRI tests ($125 per MRI and post-procedure interview)

MRIs aren’t painful or invasive, but I’m a bit claustrophobic, so I had to build up some courage before trying this. I got paid $50, on average, per MRI. They usually pay extra if you participate in a day-long interview and screening. If you go for that second option, and I suggest you do, prepare to take time away from work or school.

Participate in PET tests ($675 per PET with post-procedure interview)

These tests pay big - you can earn $600 per scan, plus $75 extra if you take part in the interview and screening. Like MRI tests, these take a whole day, so set your schedule accordingly.

It’s a huge payout, but it comes with some hassle. You’ll have to ingest or get injected with a radiotracer, which is needed for the test. Also, some scans will require the insertion of a catheter. Pays well, but it also comes at a cost. I haven’t tried this yet, but you might be willing to.

Payment Schemes

I’ve listed the average amounts above, but always check with the clinics, as these amounts are subject to change.

Most clinics pay on the final day of the test, but prepare to wait for a couple of weeks at the very longest. Also, most clinics won’t pay if you don’t actually finish the test, so always read the fine print.

The Verdict

This may not be the first money-making option on your list, but it’s definitely a legit way to make money. The payouts are even pretty good, which makes it tempting to make this a full-time career. While there are people who do just that, I wouldn’t recommend it. Try mixing up invasive and non-invasive procedures, and as with all things, do it in moderation.

Also, be wary of scam clinics that don’t adhere to safety regulations.

Keep those in mind, and you can make this a legit way to earn!

Your Turn

These are my experiences taking part in medical tests. Now it’s your turn to share. Have you done the same? What procedures did you take part in?

Let’s hear your stories!
 

CaptainE

Padawan
Apr 19, 2018
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5
I must admit I’m tempted to sign up to a clinical trial but the whole setting just scares me. Also not really sure it’s worth the pay versus the risk.
Not sure whether or not I got the guts to pull the trigger on this. Anyone on this forum tried a medical trial?
 
Last edited:

Kanvi

Bronze Wordsmith
Apr 16, 2018
310
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Haha guys! I think you are too paranoid. Participating in a medical/clinical trial is not going to turn you into a pink rabbit. Most of the medical trials you will encounter are usually split tests, where one group will be given placebo's and the other group not. Also, in the US at least you can't do human trials without FDA approval, meaning that the drug has pretty much been deemed safe already. Having said that, of course, don't do anything you are uncomfortable with and always read the fine print of whatever you sign, but if the clinical trial you're doing is you sleeping in a room with 10 cameras on you, I'd say go for it.
 
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skalentoman7

Padawan
May 22, 2018
35
16
5
Puerto Rico
I must admit I’m tempted to sign up to a clinical trial but the whole setting just scares me. Also not really sure it’s worth the pay versus the risk.

this setting riminds me a of a zombie virus movie jejejeje yea i think i would be paranoid, who really knows what there putting in your body:sick::unsure::coffee::eek::sleep:
 
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higming

Well-known member
May 26, 2018
56
55
5
Haha guys! I think you are too paranoid. Participating in a medical/clinical trial is not going to turn you into a pink rabbit. Most of the medical trials you will encounter are usually split tests, where one group will be given placebo's and the other group not. Also, in the US at least you can't do human trials without FDA approval, meaning that the drug has pretty much been deemed safe already. Having said that, of course, don't do anything you are uncomfortable with and always read the fine print of whatever you sign, but if the clinical trial you're doing is you sleeping in a room with 10 cameras on you, I'd say go for it.
You obviously are a really big risk-taker. Micro-Bots in your body. I think something is going on with the study. :)
 

ahmedo24

Padawan
Jun 26, 2018
14
9
5
Nigeria
This is interesting topics but honestly privacy is what matter to me most, and I guess most of these test trial are not really popular in African countries like in the US
 
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Burt Maklin

Padawan
Sep 24, 2018
41
8
5
I’m writing this post to show you guys that participating in medical trials is pretty safe. Very few are invasive, and unless you go with some shady clinic, you have nothing to worry about. Like everything else, you need to do some due diligence to make sure everything is legit with the clinic that’s doing the testing.

I once took part in a research program in a local university that was trying to test the effects of a ketogenic diet on a morbidly obese person. If that sounds super-specific, it’s because it is. I’ve learned medical trials and tests need to target a particular individual. In the case of the test I joined, they wanted obese people. Besides, I figured I could lose a few pounds!

What you need to know about medical trials is that they’re also super-OC about everything about the test. In my case, I had to keep a careful log of the things I ate and certain macros. I thought they would be feeding me keto-friendly food right away, but for the first two weeks, they had me eat my regular food to establish a baseline.

After that period, I had to eat the keto food they gave me. And that’s where things got even more OC. I had to send in videos of me eating the food (so they would know beyond a shadow of a doubt that I was eating the prescribed grub) while logging my weight and, uh, feelings. The upside is that I felt great and lost weight.

Anyways, I don’t want to bore you with my experiences. I just wanted to let you guys know that medical trials come in different types. Not all of them require you to have a third arm grafted onto your forehead, or subject you to a secret test to increase your mutant healing factor. Some of these tests are pretty benign and mundane.
 
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